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What is 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification?

What is 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification?

The Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC) is an alphanumerical classification scheme collaboratively produced by staff of, and based on the coverage of, the two major mathematical reviewing databases, Mathematical Reviews and Zentralblatt MATH.

Who developed subject classification?

In 1899 the Librarian of Congress Dr. Herbert Putnam and his Chief Cataloguer Charles Martel decided to start a new classification system for the collections of the Library of Congress (established 1800). Basic features were taken from Charles Ammi Cutter’s Expansive Classification.

When did the AMS Classification system come into use?

Based on a scheme to organize AMS’s Mathematical Offprint Service (MOS scheme), the AMS Classification was established for the classification of reviews in Mathematical Reviews in the 1960s. It saw various ad-hoc changes. Despite its shortcomings, Zentralblatt für Mathematik started to use it as well in the 1970s.

Is the ACM the same as the AMS?

There is some overlap between the AMS and ACM classification schemes, in subjects related to both mathematics and computer science, however the two schemes differ in the details of their organization of those topics. The classification scheme used on the arXiv is chosen to reflect the papers submitted.

What’s the current Subject Classification of American Mathematical Society?

The current 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC2010) is a revision of the MSC2000 that has been used by MR and Zbl since 2000. MSC2010 is the result of a collaborative effort by the editors of MR and Zbl to update their shared classification. These editors acknowledge the many helpful suggestions from the mathematical community during…

Is the ACM Classification system the same as the CCS?

The ACM Computing Classification System(CCS) is a similar hierarchical classificationscheme for computer science. There is some overlap between the AMS and ACM classification schemes, in subjects related to both mathematics and computer science, however the two schemes differ in the details of their organization of those topics.