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What happens when you file Chapter 13?

What happens when you file Chapter 13?

A chapter 13 bankruptcy is also called a wage earner’s plan. It enables individuals with regular income to develop a plan to repay all or part of their debts. Under this chapter, debtors propose a repayment plan to make installments to creditors over three to five years.

Is Chapter 7 or 13 better?

In many cases, Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a better fit than Chapter 13 bankruptcy. For instance, Chapter 7 is quicker, many filers can keep all or most of their property, and filers don’t pay creditors through a three- to five-year Chapter 13 repayment plan.

Does Chapter 13 take all your money?

In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you must devote all of your “disposable income” to repayment of your debts over the life of your Chapter 13 plan. Your disposable income first goes to your secured and priority creditors. Your unsecured creditors share any remaining amount.

Does Chapter 13 wipe out all debt?

Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to catch up on missed mortgage or car loan payments and restructure your debts through a repayment plan. When you complete your plan, you will receive a Chapter 13 discharge that eliminates most of your remaining debts.

Can the IRS take my tax refund if I filed Chapter 13?

If you receive a tax refund during your Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the trustee assigned to administer the case could require you to turn that money over for payment to your creditors. Fortunately, bankruptcy law allows you to modify your Chapter 13 plan to excuse payment of tax refunds in certain circumstances.

Which is worse on credit Chapter 7 or 13?

Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy both affect your credit score the same – having a Chapter 13 bankruptcy on your credit report will not be any better for your score than a Chapter 7. However, the individual reviewing your report will look at more than your score.

How much do you have to be in debt to file Chapter 13?

To be eligible to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, an individual must have no more than $419,275 in unsecured debt, such as credit card bills or personal loans. They also can have no more than $1,257,850 in secured debts, which includes mortgages and car loans.