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What are some good questions to ask an evolutionist?

What are some good questions to ask an evolutionist?

Check out these 20 questions to which evolutionists have no satisfactory answer for. These should prove to you that there is more “faith” required to believe in blind evolution than in an all-knowing Creator. 1.

Which is an example of an evolutionist relationship?

A good example of this is the relationship between bees and flowers. The bees need the nectar from some types of flowers to feed while these flowers need bees to pollinate them. Both depend on each other to exist and survive. The question for evolutionists is: 17.

Why do evolutionists not believe in natural selection?

Evolutionist Dr John Endler’s refreshing clarity about ‘natural selection’ has been largely ignored. Everyone recognizes design in a glass vase, but evolutionists refuse to believe that the flowers in the vase must also have been designed. The problem is not that they do not show design, but that they show too much design.

How to know if there is evidence for evolution?

1 Is there evidence for evolution? 2 How can you know what happened millions of years ago if no one was there to see it? 3 Does the fossil record tell us the whole story?

Do you believe that God played a role in evolution?

Religious people who believe both that evolution has occurred and that God played a role in it might nevertheless – when asked cold – choose the creationist option simply as a way of registering their belief that God exists, and not because they truly reject evolution.

How do we know that evolution is true?

Darwin noted the problem and it still remains. The evolutionary family trees in textbooks are based on imagination, not fossil evidence. 4. How do we know that is true? Has that ever been observed? Since Macro-Evolution has never been observed, how can it be taught as science? 5.

What are the questions about believing in God?

Respondents were asked whether they believe in God, a higher power or universal spirit (but not God), or neither God nor a higher power or universal spirit. Those who said they believe in God or a higher power were asked if they believe that this entity “was responsible for the creation of life on Earth.”